Ready to learn escape- how to start

So I’m ready to dip my toe into Escape after months of Horde but I find it much more intimating than horde to learn. If I join a lobby even a lower skill level and I’m thinking advanced to start, then I just end up with people speeding through kills and I’m playing catch up the whole hive not knowing where I’m heading or what I should pick up. I hate being the sandbag holding everyone off. People from here invite me, but I’m not ready for master runs and don’t want to be the person everyone carries, well no more than usual!

Has anyone done a class set up like Hulkdaddy’s for escape? I couldn’t find one.

So is my best bet to play the daily hive each day and work up to inconceivable? My experience so far with escape has been the clock and surge.

4 Likes

Doing a class setup like hulk daddy’s for escape isn’t as simple(not to devalue his horde guide). A lot of hives have their own unique set up. It depends on what weapons spawn as well as enemies. Mutators change as well making certain characters and skills useless for some hives. Playing the daily hive is probably a good start to learning what each hive has to offer

The best thing you might be able to do prep wise is find a master walkthrough that people were doing each week the hives released

3 Likes

This thread contains some very general advice and opinions about which Hives the community considered easiest and hardest. That might help with finding a starting point.

I would say that The Hive (which was one of the original launch hives) is the best starting point. It may not be the absolute easiest (it’s in my top 5 easiest) but I think it’s beautifully made from a beginners’ perspective. It is paced just right and each enemy encounter teaches you something new and essential.

The first encounter teaches you about stealth as you normally get lots of Rejects which you can execute. The only slight imbalance is that you can sometimes get (albeit rarely) a Drone spawn and the very start instead of Rejects which can be trickier the environment isn’t ideal. There are some Drones and Imagos a little further down but are fairly easy to deal with through melee combat. This is followed by some supply rooms and a Boomshot for Keegan. The fight after is a bigger one featuring a Scion - good practice, but it’s a lesson in either fighting in open spaces or luring the enemy into a narrow choke point (hint hint!).

But broadly speaking I think this is the best hive to start with.

2 Likes

If you hit me up I’ll give you some of the spawn mechanics for each maps and some of the potential aggression levels of certain checkpoints.

1 Like

Also just to add as Quantum Hulk said, character/class guides for Escape are hard due to the number of variables - there’s alot more than Horde.

However guides for individual Hives is probably a better way of organising advice. There are a few threads on here for specific Hives and they cover thing like what class to use, what cards to equip, available weapons, enemy encounters etc.

1 Like

When I began playing Escape with medium skilled character (cards not maxed and level around 15 for almost all characters except special) I began to follow solo run on YT (some are really famous here for master solo run, many thanks to them) and started one hive and did multiple time with others ransoms to test difficulties. A good character to go is Mac with boltok so that you have always a very good weapon to start and a good ultimate for almost all situations even if you enter a hive already started.
Of course, starting with a lot of The Hive is a good advise.
Lahni is a solid All-hive character with venom skills and does not rely on explosive like Keegan (which is really strong for specific hives)
I did them only Elite/Insane difficulty max because I am not enough skilled but I am trying Incon from time to time.

1 Like

Thanks for the advice, I’ve started on advanced and seeing how I do. When I have nothing to do at work I will work my way through the guides and links that you have all offered thanks. I will also run the daily on advanced to start learning the maps.

1 Like

Just started showing escape some more attention myself now thatthe leaderboards for past hives have been unlocked and now that i’ve got a couple of classes levelled up enough. It’s annoying that the wait times in the safe room are so long now though

1 Like

I shared your same reticence when i started getting ‘serious’ about escape. I just decided to dive in, and push the envelope (difficulty wise). Take my lumps and learn from my mistakes. I’ve found one particular approach or mindset works well, save a few, in most hives. Methodical, Slow and steady wins the race. Keep around, for the most part in the vicinity of your team, and be methodical and disciplined about your buisness. Hitting the actives, lining your shots, and forward movemenht all workman like and professional. Rushing forth, and splitting off from the team is usually a bad idea, but not always. Rushing will get you by on the lower levels, but on the upper difficulties the mode becomes a bit like a chess match, strategic.

Dont’ fear the venom. In fact, sometimes it’s necessary (or better) to ride the venom - as Lahni, Mac and Keegs all have venom based cards that make them very formidable during the escape.

There’s so many of them, each hive - with their caveats, encounter variety, that it can be a bit overwhelming to dive right in, but the more you run them, the more familiar you’ll become with the different scenarios that occur, and instead of being too cautious or blimey surprised, you’ll be on the ball and raring to go.

Good teamates, who know what to do, are experienced, are a godsend, and make the mode very enjoyable. And improve your success ratio greatly. Whereas with public and less experienced players, the mode is unforgiving and one boneheaded mistake can prove fatal and ruin the run. In my experience on public matchmaking good teamates are the rarity and not the norm, but as TC has improved the rewards greatly for escape, more people will play it, more often - get better and become worthwhile teamates.

I think you’d like Mac or the Anchor class, and in escape he can punch above his weight in level, so i’d suggest him (or that class) as your initial point of attention.

1 Like

Finding reliable players to party with make a huge difference in the enjoyability of escape. You will really find camaraderie and see the fruits of team play.

OP, I am open to learn with you–I have mastered a handful of hives with the help of stronger players. Add me if you wish however I am on the other side of the Atlantic.

1 Like

Thanks great post appreciate the time that took you. I will start with anchor :slight_smile:
I played the daily hive on Advanced and went to Incog, I warned my random team mate I was learning and he was cool with it but I didn’t put up a good showing, apologised and let him find a more capable team mate to get his cards. He was a decent person though, he sent me another invite but I decided against it :slight_smile:

Still it was good there are some more forgiving players out there, perhaps something I need to do on horde.

1 Like

Well you are very welcome. I’d enjoy it if you kept us aprised of your findings and what you think of Anchor.

1 Like

You may start out as a “protector” or “rear guard” type class who doesn’t require ammo. The obvious choice is Brawler. Nomad and Blademaster are also good choices. Level them up to 16 in Surge runs, just so they get all their necessary cards. Now, follow the “meta” build. For instance, for Nomad, it’s Nomad Armor, Concussive Shot, Menace, Faze, Execution Shield, and follow the general strat for playing them. All this info you can find by searching the forums, or watching someone who’s really good playing them, such as TurnerBurner or CommanderCH or whoever. Now, join up in lobbies on Incon with high lvl Marksman or Tacticians. Follow them around, taking very little ammo, if any, cleaning up annoying enemies for them such as juvies, sires, grenadiers, and just generally watching their backs, and keeping them healthy. Once you feel comfortable on Incon move up to Master. Another word of advice if you’re playing with a Marksman or Infiltrator is to take one copy of their weapon of choice, for example, longshot or gnasher so that if they happen to die before the saferoom at least you can give them your copy and they’ll have whatever ammo is in there, as well, so you’re not completely gimped in the second act.

Nothing wrong with Anchor, it’s a good class. I was almost gonna add Infiltrator to my recommended classes as well. Just decided to advise against starting out with a class that requires ammo at first. When I look back on it, many fails on high difficulties have been caused by a newbie overstepping and taking too much ammo. On some hives with very little ammo, even one misappropriated box can be the difference between failure and success. That and splitting up too far, or not watching the rear are the top two reasons for failure, IMO. If he can be equally as useful using a class that doesn’t depend on ammo, then may as well play that one, especially if he’s new and the potential is there for him to anger higher level veterans with his ammo requirements. Keep in mind, I’m not saying never play ammo-dependent classes. Obviously, they are necessary to a good team and someone has to play them. This is only until he feels more comfortable at higher difficulty (For example, after Mastering a few hives). On the other hand, if he really is set on starting out with an ammo-dependent class, I would recommend the Tactician. At least that class doesn’t need the blue boxes. Often when you’re the tactician, no one is competing with you for those red boxes, well unless you’re on a bad team.

1 Like

Don’t worry its easy.

1 Like

Savage. Lol

For me.35-0 a.k.a you #3 in tdm , it would be.

1 Like

Lol if I’m 3 you are 1.

This is inspiring to read. Their aren’t many players that are willing to grind with players that aren’t familiar with the maps. You should’ve definitely accepted the invite; those types of players are very rare and you should take advantage of their invites. Don’t worry about failing if someone voluntarily are inviting you, it’s the best way to learn!

Another good way to test the Escape waters is to play every map your interested in on Beginner, solo. Trust me, beginner might sound funny, but you’ll be surprised the challenge some of them possess, and they also allow you to recognize spawns, map patterns, etc.

2 Likes

My experience so far is that I did the first hive on master and then stopped playing escape and got back to horde. I have done some of the other maps on beginner/intermediate just to try them. Me and my girlfriend have been talking about starting doing escape but we still havent.
If you want to play with two others on the same level of escape experience we could give it a try?
We’re in Europe though so it could be a problem time wise. Since we do a lot of horde some of our characters are high level.

1 Like

An important part of escape is also knowing which class uses which weapons best. It can be a bit overwhelming due to the amount of classes but I think it’s a very important thing to learn. Especially in the public daily hives. Taking the boom from a Tactician, or The lancer from veteran for example is a quick way to make some players leave. It’s something you’ll learn through experience and will make escape much more enjoyable . Also like someone else mentioned, running the hives on beginner to learn which enemies spawn and what weapons spawn is also very good experience so your not going in blind. Wish you the best of luck and hope you enjoy Escape!

1 Like

A “Nomad” running an execution fear build may also have interest in the Lancer for its chainsaw. Especially with the ridiculous dodginess of the Retro charge against Juvies where I can literally be hitting or running up against them and it will not register. Or the fact that the charge can run past an enemy on cover because you missed by one mm.

2 Likes